Help on ID from sound recording in the SF Peaks
4 Jun 2013, 3:25 PM,
#1
Help on ID from sound recording in the SF Peaks
This morning I was up near Aspen Corner in the San Francisco Peaks. Although my primary activity was not birding, a song caught my attention - a wren-like jumble that persisted for ~30 seconds continuously. My initial thought was House Wren, which would be expected, but I'm not sure I've ever heard a HOWR sing continuously for this duration. I typically associate long-running wren songs with Pacific/Winter Wren, which would not be expected. With only my phone on me, I used its voice record function to document one bout of the song, after which I tried unsuccessfully to get a visual on the bird.

Can anyone take a stab at identifying this bird from the recording here?
http://soundcloud.com/jason-wilder-3/bir...n-corner-6

Apologies in advance for poor quality of the recording, but, frankly, I'm amazed I got anything at all useful out of the approach!

Thanks,
Jason
P.S. Maybe this isn't a wren at all! That was my hunch in the field, but I suppose it could be anything.
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4 Jun 2013, 8:07 PM,
#2
RE: Help on ID from sound recording in the SF Peaks
That is fascinating. Something about it's unwren-like to me. Reminds me of a Warbling Vireo or Townsend's Solitaire but on a nonstop loop.
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4 Jun 2013, 8:15 PM,
#3
RE: Help on ID from sound recording in the SF Peaks
I have votes via e-mail for "something finchy" and Red Crossbill. I think it does sound similar to Red Crossbill songs I can find online, although this goes on for much longer. I'll add that each song bout was long like this (20 - 30s), it wasn't a one-off thing.

Jason
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6 Jun 2013, 2:47 PM,
#4
RE: Help on ID from sound recording in the SF Peaks
It's a Townsend's Solitaire in full song.
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6 Jun 2013, 3:36 PM,
#5
RE: Help on ID from sound recording in the SF Peaks
Townsend's Solitaire seems right. I hadn't realized they could carry on like that, but apparently they can, perhaps even especially near Flagstaff - I found this on Birds of North America Online:

"Song . Complex, often prolonged; consists of rapid, clear, warbled notes; used in general contexts of territorial behavior and courtship...Singing occurs in bouts, within which single phrase may be repeated several times or many different phrases sung successively (termed “repetitive song series” and “nonrepetitive song series,” respectively, by Kramer [1980]). Bout length variable, but may exceed 15 min; in Flagstaff, AZ, during winter, median bout length 61 s"
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