is this the future of birding?
17 Feb 2019, 9:39 PM,
#1
is this the future of birding?
1. there has been a swan at peck's lake for a while, but of course it is always way too far awa to id and there is no access.
2. sam hough happened to be there today and ran into doug van gausig
3. doug had what sam called a top of the line drone and doug was excited to see the swan.
4. he flew his drone out there and took pictures - he sent 1 to sam and sam sent it to me and i attach it here.
5. doug, sam, and i all think trumpeter - maybe the one from camp verde cbc?
6. remember the rules for a big sit - you see a bird too far away to id. you are allowed to leave your circle, id the bird, and count it for the big sit.
7. so if you see a far away bird like this or way out at mormon lake or lake pleasant or havasu or lots of other places, and if you send out a drone that takes pictures that definitely id the bird, can you count it?
8. you have tio admit this is interesting.
rich armstrong
928-282-3675


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18 Feb 2019, 10:10 AM,
#2
RE: is this the future of birding?
I was at Glen Canyon Dam Overlook recently straining to identify all the birds that were so far away.  Some.... person was there with a drone which I find incredibly annoying. My first thought was "I hope it crashes." My second thought was, "Hmm, it would sure be nice to get a closer look at those ducks down there..."
I just read a discussion about Ebird not allowing FeederCam observations to be included because the bird was not seen by a real person in real time. I can't see how that makes a bit of difference to Ebird, but I suppose there might be some similar "rules" for ABA listing.
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18 Feb 2019, 2:34 PM,
#3
RE: is this the future of birding?
(18 Feb 2019, 10:10 AM)tshedwall Wrote: I was at Glen Canyon Dam Overlook recently straining to identify all the birds that were so far away.  Some.... person was there with a drone which I find incredibly annoying. My first thought was "I hope it crashes." My second thought was, "Hmm, it would sure be nice to get a closer look at those ducks down there..."
I just read a discussion about Ebird not allowing FeederCam observations to be included because the bird was not seen by a real person in real time. I can't see how that makes a bit of difference to Ebird, but I suppose there might be some similar "rules" for ABA listing.

I certainly hope this is not the future of birding.  Drones are annoying to people and wildlife.  They are not allowed in any
National Park, most wildlife areas, and other public lands.
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19 Feb 2019, 1:36 PM,
#4
RE: is this the future of birding?
(18 Feb 2019, 2:34 PM)Kimbo25 Wrote:
(18 Feb 2019, 10:10 AM)tshedwall Wrote: I was at Glen Canyon Dam Overlook recently straining to identify all the birds that were so far away.  Some.... person was there with a drone which I find incredibly annoying. My first thought was "I hope it crashes." My second thought was, "Hmm, it would sure be nice to get a closer look at those ducks down there..."
I just read a discussion about Ebird not allowing FeederCam observations to be included because the bird was not seen by a real person in real time. I can't see how that makes a bit of difference to Ebird, but I suppose there might be some similar "rules" for ABA listing.

I certainly hope this is not the future of birding.  Drones are annoying to people and wildlife.  They are not allowed in any
National Park, most wildlife areas, and other public lands.

I agree...
Gary
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20 Feb 2019, 8:42 PM,
#5
RE: is this the future of birding?
Getting back to the sighting in question:

I'm dubious that it can be ID'd as TRSW on the basis of that photo. One of the great things about drones is they give us uncommon perspectives, but in this case its a perspective that doesn't align with field guide illustrations. My doubt springs from what I perceive as a more rounded forehead, the eye less connected to the bill, and perhaps a shorter neck. Most of these same features are compromised by the view angle, so I am emphasizing the ambiguity more than stating convictions to any specie.

From Sibley
   
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16 Mar 2019, 7:11 PM,
#6
RE: is this the future of birding?
The person operating the drone at Glen Canyon Dam Overlook was breaking the law, since that area is within Glen Canyon National Recreation Area.
https://www.nps.gov/glca/learn/managemen...licies.htm
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20 Mar 2019, 7:30 PM,
#7
RE: is this the future of birding?
Human terrestrial traffic is "predictable" in at least 3 planes, and most air traffic is outside of typical avian use zones. Wildlife (and people) acclimate readily to sonic disturbance - when it is predictable. There is good evidence that many bird species can even derive an advantage from nesting within a somewhat anthropomorphically "disturbed" environment - when it is predictable. However, drones are erratic in all planes and this inherent unpredictability is problematic for wildlife. I speculate this trait, coupled with the small size of drones is more likely to trigger predation responses than most other common human devices (aircraft, auto, lawnmower, watercraft etc) in birds. Since drone pilots are unlikely to be aware of nest locations they can potentially cause undetected impacts of unknown magnitude. Finally, cumulative impacts should be considered.

The emotional human reaction is presumably because we are used to being the watchers, not the watched.
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21 Mar 2019, 3:38 PM,
#8
RE: is this the future of birding?
Drones can be dangerous to birds.  Drones come in a variety of sizes and power.  Raptors will defend their nest areas and their are drones that could break a raptor's leg, or cut the skin if the raptor flips it.  A drone flying over birds nesting in colonies out in the open could drive adults off the nests when the young are vulnerable - overheating in the sun in 10 minutes.  Laws protecting wildlife from drones would be good.
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